Labor camp explained

A labor camp is a simplified detention facility where inmates are forced to engage in penal labor. Labor camps have many common aspects with slavery and with prisons. Conditions at labor camps vary widely depending on the operators.

During the period of Stalinism, the Gulag labor camps in the Soviet Union were officially called "Corrective labor camps." The term labor colony; more exactly, "Corrective labor colony", (исправительно-трудовая колония, ИТК), was also in use, most notably the ones for underaged (16 years or younger) convicts and captured besprizorniki (street children, literally, "children without family care"). After the reform of Gulag, the term "corrective labor colony" essentially encompassed labor camps.

Labor camps in various countries

The Nazis employed many slave laborers. They also operated concentration camps, some of which provided free forced labor for industrial and other jobs while others existed purely for the extermination of their inmates. A notable example is Mittelbau-Dora labor camp complex that serviced the production of the V-2 rocket. See List of German concentration camps for more.

See also

Notes

  1. http://projekte.geschichte.uni-freiburg.de/herbert/uhpub/forcedlaborers.html Forced Laborers in the "Third Reich" - By Ulrich Herbert
  2. John Dietrich, The Morgenthau Plan: Soviet Influence on American Postwar Policy (2002) ISBN 1-892941-90-2
  3. http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1999/china.50/red.giant/prisons/wu.essay/ Labor camps reinforce China's totalitarian rule